arsis instar

SILENE UNDULATA \ SAUSSUREA INVOLUCRATA \ ROSA RUGOSA IL Y A EU UNE NE / PICEOUS PHLOX SERVICE / XEROSCAPINGS NUMINA L'UNDECLAIRE \ CHICK LUPINES \ BABY BLUE DELIGHTS A SICKNESS TENONS UNTO MORTISES /// IV RENDERED ANGELS

~*The rhythm always starts with you.*~
「He llamado al viento, le confié mi ser.」

Artists and engineers used to be like Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus. Now I think they’re coming closer together. For example, I’m working on a plugin now with a friend of mine, Barry Threw. We’re going to try to release it for free with my next single. I have been using it all over the place for vocal processing, but it’s kind of skeletal, so he’s working to help clean it up and get it ready for the public. I’ve got another friend, an independent developer, who makes music apps and little synthesizers and sells them in the iTunes store. He shares these tools with people for like, three dollars, and then somebody will make a piece of art with it.
I was at a festival in Stockholm a couple months ago called Vision of the Now, and we had various local hackers working on different problems that artists at the festival came up with. One of the questions [I came up with] was how to harness my day-to-day emotional interactions on the computer into data that I could use for musical performance. The computer is such a huge part of your daily mediation—talking on the phone, Skyping with your parents, emailing—that what goes through your computer is hyper-personal, hyper-personalized to you and your life. They hacked together this really rudimentary framework that registered keystrokes, so that anytime I made like a smiley face or a frowny face at the end of a sentence, it would plot the emotions out on a graph. I like acknowledging that my instrument is also this thing that I mediate my entire life through. For me, the computer is basically at the center of everything.
I was trying to find a way to make the laptop more expressive as a performance tool when 
I had this idea of giving the laptop itself a voice. Everybody can understand what it’s like to vocalize; almost everyone knows what it’s like to make sounds with their mouths. If you can create that kind of audience empathy, it’s really powerful. In performances now, I hold two microphones and do this swooping motion to pick up the hard drive activity in my laptop. Then I map these vocal synthesizers onto it, and it’s like the laptop is singing. That’s something that someone can understand who’s not interested in abstract music, even though the kernel of the idea is still conceptually very sound. And I think that’s when art is really powerful: when you can actually translate beyond a micro-community. Maybe only you or a few people want to nerd out about the ideas behind it, but how can you make that relevant to society as a whole? Say my mom emails me and is like, “Your dad had a heart attack,” or something extreme. How do I express emotions that come through a computer?

Artists and engineers used to be like Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus. Now I think they’re coming closer together. For example, I’m working on a plugin now with a friend of mine, Barry Threw. We’re going to try to release it for free with my next single. I have been using it all over the place for vocal processing, but it’s kind of skeletal, so he’s working to help clean it up and get it ready for the public. I’ve got another friend, an independent developer, who makes music apps and little synthesizers and sells them in the iTunes store. He shares these tools with people for like, three dollars, and then somebody will make a piece of art with it.

I was at a festival in Stockholm a couple months ago called Vision of the Now, and we had various local hackers working on different problems that artists at the festival came up with. One of the questions [I came up with] was how to harness my day-to-day emotional interactions on the computer into data that I could use for musical performance. The computer is such a huge part of your daily mediation—talking on the phone, Skyping with your parents, emailing—that what goes through your computer is hyper-personal, hyper-personalized to you and your life. They hacked together this really rudimentary framework that registered keystrokes, so that anytime I made like a smiley face or a frowny face at the end of a sentence, it would plot the emotions out on a graph. I like acknowledging that my instrument is also this thing that I mediate my entire life through. For me, the computer is basically at the center of everything.

I was trying to find a way to make the laptop more expressive as a performance tool when 
I had this idea of giving the laptop itself a voice. Everybody can understand what it’s like to vocalize; almost everyone knows what it’s like to make sounds with their mouths. If you can create that kind of audience empathy, it’s really powerful. In performances now, I hold two microphones and do this swooping motion to pick up the hard drive activity in my laptop. Then I map these vocal synthesizers onto it, and it’s like the laptop is singing. That’s something that someone can understand who’s not interested in abstract music, even though the kernel of the idea is still conceptually very sound. And I think that’s when art is really powerful: when you can actually translate beyond a micro-community. Maybe only you or a few people want to nerd out about the ideas behind it, but how can you make that relevant to society as a whole? Say my mom emails me and is like, “Your dad had a heart attack,” or something extreme. How do I express emotions that come through a computer?

(Source: thefader.com)